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, if you would like to give Greatest Dive Sites permission, only by request, to upload dive items to your FaceBook account and visa versa.

Take a look at a complete list of all photos.

At this page you will find a complete list of all scuba photos, which have all been uploaded by members. The underwater images are linked to the belonging dive site and give a good indication of what you might find while scuba diving here.

Select the region of which you would like to view some pictures.




, if you would like to give Greatest Dive Sites permission, only by request, to upload dive items to your FaceBook account and visa versa.


Pictures of 'Captain Keith Tibbetts'

Pictures of 'Cayman Brac'

While this is a common Caribbean Hogfish… the size was exceptional!  A large male that was at least 30 inches long and had to be close to 20 pounds.

Pictures of 'Radar Reef'

<p>Set within a mosaic of granular scales, an ancient eye that is as alien to us as it is familial. The ubiquity of the eye which stares right back at us, perhaps in reproach, perhaps in basic curiousity, should remind us how closely related we are to all creatures, including this billion year old species that nature invented to manage the oceans as an apex predator. CAMERA: Canon 5DM2, 100mm, YS-110a StrobesEXPOSURE: 1/90sec @ f/4.5, ISO 100LOCATION: Cayman Brac, May, 2010.</p>

Pictures of 'Bluff Wall'

<p>This was taken on a deep water wall dive, during a Live-aboard Trip with the Aggressor fleet group.</p>

Pictures of 'Other'

<p>This was taken during a deep water wall dive, (Live-aboard Trip with the Aggressor fleet group).</p>
<p>This uniquely shaped sea creature is a beautiful example of energy efficiency. The LETTUCE SEA SLUG, typically 1-2 inches long, retains the cytoplasts from the algae it eats which in turn continue to photosynthesize light creating sugar for energy. Looking back at the photo, one appreciates the design of the LETTUCE SEA SLUG and it's array of solar energy dishes across the top of it's body.</p>
<p>This Squirrelfish was defending his territory... not happy at my presence.  Good to catch him with his dorsal fin so high.</p>
<p>This is a fairly common Banded Butterfly fish.  I have been impressed by the size the tropicals reach in the Cayman Islands</p>
<p>This was taken in the Devil's Grotto at Eden Rocks.</p>